Backstage Travels

All the world's a stage…

Day 9: Subdued and winding down

on March 11, 2014

This morning started later than usual, and we gathered to watch a documentary about a young man named Michael Levin. He was American, but felt deeply about Israel and what it stood for. So when he was old enough, he made alliah (making pilgrimage to Israel), and joined the IDF to support and even fight for Israel. He made quite a mark on the people that he worked with, and died in the line of duty. It’s a really moving story, and I recommend looking it up.

This was our warm up for visiting Har Hertzel, the military cemetary for the IDF.

We didn’t even start the day with Sha-La-La. The bus ride was subdued and long. Snow had been dumped exactly where we were heading, and drifts were getting almost 4 or 5 feet tall. We finally arrived two and a half hours later, and started walking though the place, at one point ducking under some CAUTION: KEEP OUT tape (though it was in Hebrew). Officials came and kicked us out, almost. We stayed in the front courtyard area, where the Israelis performed a short ceremony in honor of the fallen soldiers.

Obviously the feelings of the military is different there because every citizen is required to join for two years, unless they have strong religious aversion, in which case they perform other civic duties for that time.

We had a short lunch break in the city, and I had shwarma for the first time. So good.

We went back to the Old City, and toured Mt. Zion. This place is sacred to all three of the major monotheistic religions

There’s a small Orthodox synagog inside.

Afterwards, we went to the Western Wall for a small good bye ceremony. The Egalitarian side of the Wall was closed because of the snow, so we went back to the Orthodox side.

There was a full moon.

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We all took pictures with the Israelis before we said our goodbyes.

We then went into the tunnel to the Muslim Quarter to be a little more sheltered. Everyone shared something about the experience with meeting all these different people. I was really sorry to see everyone go. We were told at the beginning that once the Israelis joined us, we’d wonder how we ever felt that our group was complete without them. We were skeptical at first, before they arrived. Now, we totally believed it.

We finished and then all got on the bus to drop them off at a bus stop. It seemed so strange to just leave them on the side of the road. The rest of the ride was subdued, but differently from the beginning of the day.

When we got back to the hostel, after dinner we had a meeting to prepare ourselves for the next day. We were going to go to the Israeli Holocaust museum, Yad Vashem. We started talking about why it’s important to remember, and modern antisemitism. So many people, including myself, shared stories. Shira told us that if the Israelis had been with us, they’d be surprised at all these stories. While they might be rare for us, it’s commonplace compared with how Jewish people are treated in Israel.

Each of us were given a piece of paper, and a candle. On each paper was the name and biography of a different child. A child that was killed in the Holocaust. We lit the candles and set them in front of our chairs, then went around the circle to read out the names and ages of the children we were given and blow out the candles.

We were told to leave when ever we felt like it. I sat for a long time.


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