Backstage Travels

All the world's a stage…

Day 10: Remembering

on March 11, 2014

The morning was spent traveling to, and touring Yad Vashem. We could not tour the whole campus because the snow damaged some tree and was blocking parts of the property. It wasn’t all bad, though. That gave us more time in the museum itself.

The entire building is a symbol, all the way through. It’s a triangle, one half of a magendavid; the Holocaust took half of a people away. When you walk in, you can see the end of the building, but you can’t get there straight away, because it’s blocked by several installations that are surrounded by wire fencing. There were a few skylights that allowed natural light in certain places that showcased tiny rays of hope in a terrible, dark time in history.

There were no pictures allowed in the museum, but that’s just fine. I don’t think I’d ever want to see pictures of the inside, nor would pictures capture what you see in there. There are the the things that everyone expects, like the Nazi propaganda and the pictures of the camps, but it’s the subtle things that really got me. There were antisemitic artworks and board games. There was also an installation about some of the worst Nazis…but it was about how they were well-educated, otherwise normal people. That was really difficult to see. It’s so easy to think of these people as monsters…but isn’t that how they saw us in the war?

When we got to the Warsaw Ghetto exhibit, we saw where they had installed bricks and rail road from the actual place. We saw videos and pictures of how terrible conditions were. However, it was still kind of like a town…and the people naturally got bored. The most striking things for me to see was how these people amused themselves. They put on plays for each other, and we saw photos of the casts. They played for each other. They painted and drew and thrived as a suffering, terrified people. As a theatre person, it’s fascinating and refreshing to know that art was, is, and can be used as a tool for relief from terrible social situations. It’s also heart wrenching, because that was all some people had.

We saw diaries and letters. Heart breaking and inspiring alike. Then I saw a hand drawn board game. A personalized version of Monopoly called based on their ghetto. It struck me, and I had no words. It was like they accepted this life as truth, but felt they also deserved a semi-normal life…and a game based of their life.

The last room is dedicated to remembering those who died. There are photos, and books that the Foundation is trying to fill with biographies of those people. Unfortunately, so many records were destroyed, and so many towns were just flat out destroyed that we might not ever be able to name them all.

The view outside the place is phenomenal. It’s representative of the future for Israel and the Jewish people.

 

It was astonishing that there was a gift shop. It wasn’t garish, though, which was refreshing. There were many books, even if there were a few souvenirs. I flipped through one book full of poems. One was written by a woman who watched men take her mother and her sister’s son away. She confessed that she traded her elderly mother for her sister to stay, because the men were taking the son and one other regardless. I couldn’t read any more after that.

The bus ride was a nice buffer for lunch, which we had in the shook in New Jerusalem. We walked all up and down the marketplace, and negotiated for some very delicious pizza challah rolls. There was also a bit of shopping where I bought some beautiful artwork. (I’m on the ship, and the artwork is at home, so pictures some point in the future.) It was fun to haggle, but I don’t think I’m very good at it. At one point, our Israeli soldier guard/guide, Ziv, was with us, and helped us with some of the prices.

 

We got back on the bus, which has long since felt like our home away from home, and drove by the security fence, and learned a bit about Israeli security.

Then we stopped by the bus stop where there was a bombing in 2002. I just can’t imagine, even after 9/11/2001, going along your day and having to be fearful of the buses, even.

 

We had dinner at the hostel, and then blew off some steam with another night out in Tel Aviv. We “accidentally” bumped into some people we knew, and had a grand time in another bar. Ofer and I got into another deep conversation, and it lasted almost the whole time we were there. At one point I was telling him and some others about the way Frank proposed to me, and it really touched him. He felt a deep connection with me, and he decided to give me a great gift: part of his IDF uniform. It is one of the best things I have to remember my experience.

 

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